Featured News

The 2014 AAPS Conference ended yesterday November 19th, 2014 in Cape Town, South Africa. AAPS is a network of 51 university-based planning programmes in Anglophone, Lusiphone and Francophone Africa. For the first time the AAPS conference held every two years opened its doors to partners and key stakeholders in the built environment. In recent years AAPS has grown rapidly to became the new champions and torch for Africa’s future.

Fri, 2014-11-21 11:16

The inaugural Conference on Land Policy in Africa (CLPA) is being held at the African Union Conference Centre, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, from 11 to 14 November 2014. The CLPA is organized by the Land Policy Initiative (LPI), in partnership with the Economic Commission for Africa (ECA, the African Development Bank (AfDB), the European Union (EU), UN-Habitat, the FAO, among others.

Fri, 2014-11-14 09:55

Namibia is one of the few African countries which have recognized the importance of decentralized development in nation building. The Constitution has established structures and functional responsibilities of regional and local councils.

Fri, 2014-11-07 12:07

The Centre for Urban Research and Innovations (CURI) has collaborated with the UN-Habitat´s Urban Energy Unit to conduct an energy audit in informal settlements in Kenya. This research will address existing gaps in terms of consistent, relevant and adequate data on various types of buildings in informal settlements. It will allow formulating benchmarks, as well as identifying opportunities and energy saving potentials.

Sat, 2014-11-01 12:14

From our Blog

Well, sweet is the fragrance of successful completion. Community proposals feedback marked completion of Kitui Learning Studio, laying solid foundations to pave way for community-driven implementation phase. Whilst the conventional planning processes are characterized by vertical hierarchical exchange of ideas and engagement in plan decision making, the Kitui Learning studio was anchored on integration and inclusivity:

It is well known and understood that public transport in Nairobi is accompanied by the struggles of traffic jam and misbehaviour by public service drivers. Just recently at the beginning of March, the long rain season began earnestly.

Service provision in majority of Kenya’s informal settlements is predominantly controlled by Non-Governmental Organizations (NGO’s) and cartels. This phenomenon is prompted by government’s reluctance to provide services in informal settlements owing to their informal nature.

Land tenure is among the key elements that define slum settlements. The lack of tenure security limits both private and public investments in settlements translating to slum conditions. The form of land tenure also has implications on which settlements get upgraded whether by government, communities or other partners.