Featured News

The fourth African Urban Research Initiative Meeting was held in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania on the 28-30 June 2015. Africa Urban Research initiative (AURI) is a network composed of 12 urban research centres across the African continent established in 2013. AURI supports existing and future Africa based research centres to improve the capacity of individual centres to undertake collaborative urban research and to engage with key decision---makers to proactively address Africa’s urban transition. The meeting was supported by  the Ford Foundation, as part of a one-year work programme aimed at consolidating the network and refining collective thinking on key issues that will ultimately inform the forthcoming AURI publications for dissemination at the 2015 Africities conference and Habitat III in 2016. In attendance from the University of Nairobi was Prof Peter M. Ngau (CURI) and Prof Winnie Mitullah (IDS).

Fri, 2015-07-03 14:00

The University of Nairobi held its annual tree planting at Ngong hills over looking the beautiful Nairobi city on one side and the vast rift Vally on the other. Ngong hill forms the catchment of Ngong river- which flows through the city of Nairobi and drain into  the greater Athi river that flows to Indian Ocean. Recent floods in Nairobi showed the  limitations of the city in managing such water flows from the mountain. This can be assosiated to the increased deforestation and the encroachment of riparian reserves by rogue constructions. The University of Nairbo hopes to continue support the plight of environmental conservation not only through research but also through action.

Mon, 2015-05-25 05:46

The Centre for Urban Research and Innovations (CURI) in collaboration with Institute of Development Studies (IDS) held a one-day The Kenya National Stakeholders Urban Workshop’ on 11th of May 2015 themed ‘Promoting Inclusive Growth in African Cities’. The workshop was organized by the African Urban Research Initiative (AURI) is a network of applied urban research centres located across all regions of sub-Saharan Africa supported by the Ford Foundation to which CURI and IDS are members.

Mon, 2015-05-11 17:02

The Centre for Urban Research and Innovation met with members of the Participatory Slum Upgrading Program  from the UN Habitat, on the 7th of May 2015 at the YMCA. The UN Habitat PSUP is an initiative of the Africa, Caribbean and Pacific Secretariat funded by the European Commission and implemented by UN Habitat. The aim of the programme in Kenya is to strengthen community, city and national key stakeholders’ capacities in slum upgrading in the country by the national governments and some of the county governments.

Thu, 2015-05-07 16:43

From our Blog

Well, sweet is the fragrance of successful completion. Community proposals feedback marked completion of Kitui Learning Studio, laying solid foundations to pave way for community-driven implementation phase. Whilst the conventional planning processes are characterized by vertical hierarchical exchange of ideas and engagement in plan decision making, the Kitui Learning studio was anchored on integration and inclusivity:

It is well known and understood that public transport in Nairobi is accompanied by the struggles of traffic jam and misbehaviour by public service drivers. Just recently at the beginning of March, the long rain season began earnestly.

Service provision in majority of Kenya’s informal settlements is predominantly controlled by Non-Governmental Organizations (NGO’s) and cartels. This phenomenon is prompted by government’s reluctance to provide services in informal settlements owing to their informal nature.

Land tenure is among the key elements that define slum settlements. The lack of tenure security limits both private and public investments in settlements translating to slum conditions. The form of land tenure also has implications on which settlements get upgraded whether by government, communities or other partners.